News


The quiet students sitting in the back row remind Col. Wayne Don of himself the most. They’re why he returns every summer to speak with students at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Rural Alaska Honors Institute. The 1989 RAHI alumnus shares how he got out of his comfort zone by asking questions in his criminal justice classes. While attending RAHI, Don decided that even though he was shy, he would become a public speaker.

Read full story »


Research team members have five new sensors that allow them to continuously monitor ocean acidification conditions in Alaska’s Kachemak Bay. The sensors, installed in September, allow researchers from University of Alaska Fairbanks, Kachemak Bay Research Reserve and Kasitsna Bay Laboratory to collect a range of environmental data.

Read full story »



Life exists everywhere you look. Even on glacier ice, home to inch-long worms, snow fleas, bacteria and algae. When gathered by the millions on the ice, algae cells can help make the water they need to survive. Alaska scientists recently studied this living agent of glacier melt.

Read full story »




The plentiful logjams that line the Chena River can be annoying, scary or even dangerous for kayakers and canoers traveling downstream. But researchers believe they could be safe and supportive habitat allowing young salmon to survive the treacherous journey to adulthood.

Read full story »



In her study of one of the farthest-north lynx populations in North America this summer, Claire Montgomerie used her ears. While looking at the satellite tracker a female lynx was wearing, Montgomerie saw the animal was hanging around a hillside north of the Arctic Circle, not far from Coldfoot.

Read full story »


In 1963, 23-year-old geologist David Whistler sat down for lunch on a rocky hilltop one mile above Kennicott Glacier. With one hand on his sandwich and the other on his miner’s pick, he flipped over rocks. One of them made him pause. Embedded in the stone was a row of sharp teeth.

Read full story »



Posts navigation